Category: Breast-Feeding

Breast-Feeding

Breast-Feeding

Human breast milk is now widely acknowledged to be the most complete form of nutrition for infants, with a range of physiological and psychological benefits for both the infant and mother. Through the ages, humans have been dependent on it for its sustenance and even contraceptive attributes. Research supports the observation of benefits for infants’ [...]

August 1, 2011 More
Cautions about breast-feeding

Cautions about breast-feeding

Human milk provides the most complete form of nutrition for infants, including premature and sick newborns, with rare exception. When direct breast-feeding is not possible, expressed milk should be provided. In cases of maternal infection, the basic tenet is that breast-feeding is rarely contraindicated. The few exceptions are situations where infectious agents may be associated [...]

August 1, 2011 More
Reproductive function during lactation

Reproductive function during lactation

It is helpful to know that the elevation of prolactin, and the abrupt withdrawal of ovarian and gonadotrophin hormones after childbirth and during lactation may lead to decreased breast sensitivity during lovemaking, vaginal epithelium atrophy, dryness, and decreased cervical mucus as well. These changes may, in turn, lead to discomfort during sexual intercourse and increase [...]

August 1, 2011 More
Postpartum and beyond

Postpartum and beyond

In the first few days of breast-feeding, immediately after delivery and before the mature milk comes in, a thick, yellowish liquid known as colostrum is produced in small quantities and secreted from the nipples. Yet this “premilk” is sufficient to nourish the baby, satisfy the baby, and protect the baby from jaundice and many infectious [...]

August 1, 2011 More

Trends and practices

From the dawn of civilization women have entertained the use of special feeding flasks, wet nurses, and mixed concoctions of animal milk as alternate methods to nurture infants. Uninformed concerns about maternal beauty, nobility, and the etiquette of the wealthy fueled many of these practices. In the mid-1900s, when most advances in science were perceived [...]

August 1, 2011 More