The triggers of major depressive disorder

November 12, 2012

The triggers of major depressive disorder

Depression is a term that it used very often and very widely. It is commonly used to describe a temporary mood or feeling that is not actually directly linked to clinical depression. One type of clinical depression is known as major depressive disorder, which can have a severe effect on the suffererÂ’s life. These people often experience symptoms such as a loss of interest in things, insomnia and feelings of hopelessness and guilt. Major depressive disorder is a serious condition, which can lead to suicide when left undiagnosed or untreated. Even when it doesnÂ’t lead to this extreme measure major depressive disorder can make it impossible for sufferers to carry out their normal routines of everyday life. Major depressive disorder may be caused by a trigger, a traumatic event or a series of negative events occurring over a period of time. An obvious trigger may be the loss of a loved one, either through death, divorce or separation. Social problems are another common cause of clinical depression and a friend moving away or a feeling of isolation could cause such a reaction. In these cases other symptoms often include a loss of self-confidence or self-esteem. Additionally big life changes can cause increased levels of stress, anxiety or restlessness all of which are contributing factors. Financial worries through losing a job or coming in to debt as well as dealing with confliction and having a baby are all potential triggers of major depressive disorder. Major depressive disorder can occur in both men and women of all ages including children. However the group most likely to suffer from the condition seems to be women. This is probably due to the hormonal changes that women go through at different stages in their life including, puberty, menstruation and pregnancy, all of which are known triggers of depression. Additionally the added responsibility of caring for children or elders in need of care can often cause extra stress. However, the notion that women are more likely to suffer from major depressive disorder may be derived through men being less willing to discuss or diagnose the symptoms of depression. Treatment for major depressive disorder should be sought as soon as the symptoms become apparent. Due in part to suicidal tendencies, life expectancy of sufferers is considered to be shorter tan normal. This is also due to sufferers neglecting to take care of their own health and therefore making themselves more susceptible to health problems and illness. Major depressive disorder is a complex condition and our understanding of it is still limited. Studies continue to be conducted into the most accurate ways of diagnosing it and the most effective ways of treating it. At the moment the most common treatment is antidepressant medications to control the symptoms combined with psychotherapy to address the core problem. If the individual suffering from major depressive disorder displays harmful or suicidal tendencies then hospitalisation may be required.

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