Featured Articles

  • Tips For Eating Out

    Tips For Eating Out

    Eating out is always tricky when you’re on a diet, but there is no need to avoid going out altogether. Try to limit your meals out to once a week during the weight-loss phase of your diet. Once you have moved onto the maintenance plan, you can eat out more often. Here are some simple [...]

    November 16, 2012 More
  • White tea – White delight

    White tea – White delight

    Let’s deal with the colour question first. Why is it white if it comes from the same plant as green and black tea — Camellia sinensis ? Indeed, it does, but it’s made from the unopened buds, which are clothed in a fuzz of fine, silvery “hairs”, giving it a whitish colour. When it’s made [...]

    November 2, 2012 More
  • Red yeast rice

    Red yeast rice

    Red yeast rice, or red fermented rice, is a fermented product of rice on which a species of red yeast, Monascus purpureus, has been grown. It has been used for centuries in China as both a food and a medicinal product. The first documented use of red yeast rice was as early as 800 CE [...]

    November 1, 2012 More
  • Almond Oil – an ancient beauty elixir

    Almond Oil – an ancient beauty elixir

    Almond oil has been used for centuries as an all-over beauty treatment that fosters healthy skin, hair and nails. Now, this beauty therapists favourite is appearing in more retail products, as consumers learn the benefits of this humble yet powerful natural moisturiser. Among the oils used in professional beauty therapy treatments, almond oil is a [...]

    October 31, 2012 More
  • Chlorella – This ancient organism is a powerful modern healing tool

    Chlorella – This ancient organism is a powerful modern healing tool

    Chlorella is a unicellular, microscopic, freshwater green algae that grows most rapidly in areas with plenty of sunlight and fresh water. It was one of the first lifeforms to exist three-and-a-half million years ago. Chlorella is widely distributed in fresh water all over the world It has efficient nutrient uptake mechanisms and through photosynthesis reproduces [...]

    October 31, 2012 More
  • Trichomonas vaginalis is the cause of vaginitis.

    Trichomoniasis

    Trichomonads are motile, flagellate, protozoan organisms known to cause a diverse spectrum of diseases in humans. Most of these diseases are rare. The single exception is Trichomonas vaginalis, the most significant of these parasites, which infects between 3 and 5 million American women each year. The organism causes an inflammation of the vaginal wall, or [...]

    September 29, 2011 More
  • Tattoos

    Tattoos

    Tattoos have been used in many cultures to identify beauty, position or status, and worth. They mark rites of passage, such as a life cycle event (marriage, pregnancy, childbirth, death), change in an individual’s social position, the progression from childhood to puberty, and the initiation into social and different family groups. For instance, both men [...]

    September 28, 2011 More
  • Stretch Marks

    Stretch Marks

    Striae gravidarum, also known as “stretch marks,” arise during pregnancy in the majority of women. Common locations include the abdomen, breasts, buttocks, and thighs. Although the exact etiology is unknown, mechanical stress on connective tissue due to increased size of the various portions of the body is thought to be important. There are no significant [...]

    September 28, 2011 More
  • Smoking

    Smoking

    Approximately 28% of all men and 22% of all women are current cigarette smokers. Factors that influence smoking initiation, addiction, and smoking cessation as well as the health consequences of smoking are generally similar in men and women. SMOKING INITIATION Many women start to smoke as teenagers. Current figures indicate that, in 2000, about 30% [...]

    September 28, 2011 More
  • Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia

    Schizophrenia is a severe mental illness that affects 1% of the world’s population. Contrary to popular opinion, schizophrenia is not a “split personality.” Schizophrenia is a chronic disorder in which individuals experience disturbances in thinking and behavior. People with schizophrenia have a higher risk of suicide, and approximately 10% of all people with schizophrenia commit [...]

    September 26, 2011 More

Recent Articles

‘Good’ Patients, ‘Bad’ Patients

‘Good’ Patients, ‘Bad’ Patients

He was the kind of patient I went to medical school for. By the time I met him, he had had a rough go of it. After learning the previous year that he had lymphoma, he was fortunate enough to receive a bone marrow transplant — only to have his body promptly reject it. On [...]

April 17, 2013 More
Getting a Brain Boost Through Exercise

Getting a Brain Boost Through Exercise

Two new experiments, one involving people and the other animals, suggest that regular exercise can substantially improve memory, although different types of exercise seem to affect the brain quite differently. The news may offer consolation for the growing numbers of us who are entering age groups most at risk for cognitive decline. It was back [...]

April 16, 2013 More
Sleep Less, Weigh More

Sleep Less, Weigh More

A new study suggests that adolescent obesity could be decreased if teenagers got more sleep, and the heaviest would benefit most. For a study published last week in Pediatrics, researchers surveyed 1,429 ninth graders, gathering data on height and weight. The children reported their sleep habits on weekdays and weekends to the nearest 15 minutes. [...]

April 15, 2013 More
A Seasonal Pattern to Mental Health

A Seasonal Pattern to Mental Health

A new study using the patterns of Google search queries suggests that mental illnesses flourish in winter and decline in summer. In both the United States and Australia, researchers found distinct seasonal patterns, high in winter and low in summer, in searches pertaining to anxiety, obsessive compulsive disorder, bipolar disorder, eating disorders, depression, suicide, attention [...]

April 15, 2013 More
Avoiding Emergency Rooms

Avoiding Emergency Rooms

On a recent Sunday afternoon, a 75-year-old Philadelphia man with a fever of over 102 degrees was unable to reach his doctor. So his daughter took him to an emergency room, where the two sat for hours until he was examined by a physician who found no reason for the fever and decided to admit [...]

April 15, 2013 More
Alcohol and Breast Cancer Survival

Alcohol and Breast Cancer Survival

Alcohol consumption is known to increase the risk for breast cancer. But a new study suggests that moderate drinking has little effect on survival after diagnosis, and may reduce deaths from cardiovascular disease. Researchers, writing online in The Journal of Clinical Oncology, studied 22,890 women with breast cancer, recording information on alcohol intake before diagnosis [...]

April 14, 2013 More
Where Germs Hide in Your Kitchen

Where Germs Hide in Your Kitchen

Beware of the blender: It may be a bacteria trap. So says a new report that looked at the places and appliances in household kitchens that are most – and least – likely to harbor germs like E. coli and salmonella. The report found that some of the areas people considered most likely to be [...]

April 14, 2013 More
Ask Well: Do Ball Chairs Offer Benefits?

Ask Well: Do Ball Chairs Offer Benefits?

Q I know sitting at a desk all day is really bad for me. Is sitting on an exercise ball any better? What if instead of sitting in an office chair, I perch with good posture on an exercise ball? Seems like sitting that way engages some of my muscles so perhaps isn’t quite so [...]

April 14, 2013 More
Cracking the Walnut

Cracking the Walnut

Nuts can add lots of flavor and crunch to your favorite dishes, and they just happen to be good for you. In this week’s Recipes for Health, Martha Rose Shulman celebrates the versatility of the walnut. As she writes: I routinely throw them into salads of all kinds, and finely chopped walnuts can go into [...]

April 13, 2013 More
Safer Hospital Rooms

Safer Hospital Rooms

C. difficile contamination of hospital rooms is a leading cause of deadly infections, and human behavior may be at least as important as technological innovation in controlling it. A new study has found that imposing a three-step cleaning procedure — and supervising it carefully — can nearly eliminate the microbe. Over a 21-month period at [...]

April 12, 2013 More
Trial of Chelation Therapy Shows Benefits, but Doubts Persist

Trial of Chelation Therapy Shows Benefits, but Doubts Persist

Chelation therapy has been used as an alternative treatment for heart disease since the 1950s, but with scanty evidence to support the practice, most medical doctors have long dismissed it as little more than quackery. But now a prestigious medical journal has published the results of a large, long-term clinical trial of chelation in heart [...]

April 12, 2013 More
A Battle Plan to Lose Weight

A Battle Plan to Lose Weight

Laura Ward, 41, had always attributed her excess pounds to the drugs she takes for major depression. So Ms. Ward, who is 5-foot-6 and once weighed 220 pounds, didn’t try to slim down or avoid dietary pitfalls like fried chicken. But in a clinical trial, Ms. Ward managed to lose more than 30 pounds doing [...]

April 12, 2013 More
Elderly Patients Routinely Prescribed Risky Drugs

Elderly Patients Routinely Prescribed Risky Drugs

Doctors in the United States routinely prescribe potentially harmful drugs to older patients, and the problem is particularly acute in the South, a new study shows. The analysis found that more than one in five seniors on Medicare in the South were prescribed medications that health authorities have specifically advised doctors to avoid giving to [...]

April 11, 2013 More
Why We’re Motivated to Exercise. Or Not

Why We’re Motivated to Exercise. Or Not

If you give a rat a running wheel and it decides not to use it, are genes to blame? And if so, what does that tell us about why many people skip exercise? To examine those questions, scientists at the University of Missouri in Columbia recently interbred rats to create two very distinct groups of [...]

April 11, 2013 More

Really? Eating Fish as a Child May Curb Allergies

THE FACTS Researchers used to think that children who started eating fish at an early age were more likely to develop allergies. But lately, the tide has turned. Now scientists suspect that introducing fish at an early age may help protect against allergies. Some even argue that the rising prevalence of allergic diseases may have [...]

April 10, 2013 More
Thinking Twice About Calcium Supplements

Thinking Twice About Calcium Supplements

Americans seem to think that every health problem can be solved with a pill. And certainly many are, especially infectious diseases that succumb to antibiotics, antifungals and, increasingly, antivirals. But that leaves a medical dictionary full of ailments that continue to plague people despite the best efforts of Big Pharma. Most are chronic health problems [...]

April 8, 2013 More

Think Like a Doctor: The Baby Who Won’t Eat Solved!

On Thursday, we challenged Well readers to solve the mystery of a 3-month-old baby who stopped eating and became weak. More than 700 readers wrote in with their take on this terrifying case. More than 100 nailed the diagnosis. And I loved all the discussion! The correct diagnosis is… Infant botulism. The first person with [...]

April 8, 2013 More
One Fish, Two Fish

One Fish, Two Fish

Everyone knows fish is good for you, but many of us get stuck eating the same varieties – tuna, cod, salmon and shrimp. This week Martha Rose Shulman explores the flavor and benefits of trying new types of fish. This week I made five different fish dishes and did not use any of the favorite [...]

April 8, 2013 More
Ask Well: More Repetitions vs. More Weight?

Ask Well: More Repetitions vs. More Weight?

Q In weight training, is it better to increase the number of repetitions or the amount of weight over time? Asked by Sharon • 119 votes A If by “better,” you mean helps you gain muscle and strength without hurting yourself, then “the answer, to me, is pretty clear,” said Stuart Phillips, a professor of [...]

April 8, 2013 More

The Roving Runner: Elevating the Jog

No smoking, dog-walking, biking, skating or scooting. There is a sign stating certain things you may not do on the High Line, Manhattan’s celebrated, elevated pedestrian park that was once a freight railway. Do not throw objects, amplify sound or walk on the gravel or weeds. But something is missing from the list: a prohibition [...]

April 5, 2013 More